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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)
students, who have joined us to go on an exploration of religion. but what a journey it is. [ music ] [male voice:] so be it. [crowd:] so be it. [male voice:] tonight - [crowd:] tonight - [dr. simons:] this is armageddon, the field of armageddon. this is definitely not your father's oldsmobile. we're at the western wall, the last remaining wall of the second temple. we're at the san francisco zen center. it was the site of illinois greatest religious drama - the exodus of the mormons. this is the spot where jesus reputedly cried for jerusalem. [ music ] [male voice:] i'm not talking about god or buddha. [ music ] [female voice:] at the end of it, what is it for? for peace. [male voice:] you just discover it within our selves. [dr. simons:] we'll go through 24 classes in which we'll meet real believers from real religious settings and then we've added two new classes, the twenty fifth and the twenty sixth class back in the setting in which we'll discuss issues such as religion and violence, very much on people's minds. religion and science - new ways that science is helping us understand spi
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, stopbullying.gov where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
is. i went from republicans to independents, to democrat. three reasons. number one, i want religion out of the party. i have a religion. that's my business. i have a political party. that's the political parties business. number two, women's issues. i don't personally believe in abortion, but i don't believe i have the rights tell my neighbor what they should do. i think the republican party needs to get out of people's bedrooms and back into the boardrooms. number three, the middle-class tax hikes their break-in instituted. we never recovered from that. to my city unions. all things that had middle-class workers. ending tax like state sales tax, all of these things it is strictly, so i know when it happened. it was in the reagan years. >> host: thanks, caller. >> guest: >> guest: a few republican come you a liberal one. undertake the supporters. she says she wants religion out of politics. i wonder she would've felt that way about the civil rights movement because it is actually martin luther king was not only a top her. he was also the reverend dr. martin luther king. the power of
-rights laws that prohibit firing, promoting and hiring based on race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those immutable characteristics that we think are worthy of the protection of our civil rights laws. in most states there are modest exemptions to the employment at will dadoctrine, amount wrongful discharge. when an employer requires someone to break the law in order to keep their job. or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of a well-defined written public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wi de latitude, because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person that takes the risk and set up a business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their business the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. again, this is a small one. not saying that you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified for your job. in essence, what these laws do rainout are saving employers from themselves, because if they are ignoring all of the unem
in prayer each week, members of the prayer caucus also work together to preserve the presence of religion, faith and morality in the marketplace of ideas. we're seeing increased efforts to remove references to god and fate from the public square. activists seek to remove god from our national motto and pledge of allegiance. they seek to prevent city and county councils from praying and recognizing our nation's spiritual heritage. and they seek to silence people who wish to live out their faith. members of the prayer caucus have countered these efforts successfully, ensuring that our history remains in tact for future generations. in the 112th congress, i introduced a resolution reaffirming our national motto, in god we trust, and encouraging its public display in public buildings. the measure passed overwhelmingly by a vote of 396-0. some asked why we needed to reaffirm our national motto. yet if left unstated, the motto could be changed in a de facto matter. in november, 2010, before a worldwide audience and a much publicized speech focusing on the united states relationship -- united st
for the president and members of congress to show off their religion one day a year? >> i think it's very odd. i think that there is a little too much overt religiosity going on. and then it suddenly put back in the pocket and then -- >> bill: no, i agree. i grew up under the creed that you did not wear your religion on your sleeve. and you know, you had it. it was real. it was genuine but you didn't brag about it. the problem i have with the prayer breakfast is everybody gets up and tries to outdo each other and how my faith is so strong and i pray all the time and i'm so close to jesus. come on. >> right. exactly. >> bill: it is not something to brag about. i don't think it's real if you brag about it. >> are you allowed to be diverse at the prayer breakfast? >> bill: no. no. it is one way. something else, sort of kind of related. we talked earlier in the week, victoria, about the fact that we've struggled with same-sex marriage in this country for so long, the president came around on it last year after evolving, he said. he did evolve. in the right direction. and took him a long time. but st
. you know, it is an area that does not want somebody else's religion or life. the one better health care and better schools. they visit washington and do not understand the fight in a lot of ways. >> specifically when it comes to technology related issues, do you hear anything? >> there is concern about innovation and the role that current law has in the area of copyright and patents stifling innovation. that is typical to remedy. we have a patented build that i did not vote for last year, having worked on it for 12 years. it did not do what we hoped it would do. we have an overarching scheme on copyright enforcement that is probably not that positive in terms of technology and innovation. i'm sure you all remember soapa. i'm talking about individuals who are inventing things and creating things real that there is a problem in terms of the copyright and he can become together and make sure that the laws work in the internet age? that is something i went to work on. i will be introducing some bills. try to get a discussion going. >> when you walk around here, do you see a lot of cons
but stands by his religion. the oregon department of justice is investigating. >>> finally in missouri, a kansas city church is showing a sign of support for gay boy scouts. the church posted a gay pride banner, welcoming all members of the boy scouts of america. the youth organization is set to discuss lifting the ban on gays and lesbians this week. >>> turning to sports, super bowl xlvii looked like a blowout. but turned out to be a thriller. in the first quarter, ravens' quarterback joe flacco connected with antoine bolden for touchdown pass and early lead. in the second, baltimore scored two more touchdowns to make it look like a blowout. they went to halftime with the 21-3 lead. in the third, the ravens' jacoby jones had a record with a 109-yard kickoff return. the longest in super bowl history. and that made it 28-6, ravens over the 49ers. then the power goes out in the superdome. it took 34 minutes before the lights were back on and play was restarted. then momentum shifted quickly as san francisco scored two touchdowns in less than 2 1/2 minutes. in the fourth quarter, niners'
poor of all colors stripes tongues and religions that your country wronged you in separate and discrete ways, gronke with horrific and lingering consequences, wronged you in some cases from long ago and for a very long time, to a degree that would morally compel any civilized nation serious and sustained attention. >> guest: we don't want to talk about it. we still don't want to talk about it. we run from it. we now call it victimization, so it's not to be raised. it's a sad truth. >> host: why did you leave the country? >> guest: well i was as much going to a place as leaving a place. i have been going to st. kitts in the caribbean for 25 years, and it's a small island. it is made for someone like me who doesn't like big crowded places, big cities. it's an exquisitely beautiful place with mountains and clear blue water and a kind of smallness that allows the kind of intimacy you seldom go downtown and don't see someone that you know. but the biggest piece of it is that the woman i loved and married is from st. kitts, so we had decided many years ago that we were going to build a home t
or the value of religion and i do think that's one of the reasons why president obama continues the tradition going his fifth he year here. there's something religiously for politicians it's a common language, trying to bridge the gap between themselves and a number of americans. we've heard president obama do that in past years in very real terms. we've learned things about him. last year we learned that he prays every day. he said he gets up in the morning, says a brief prayer and spends some time in scripture and devotion and obviously talking i think a lot in evangelical tones at the time you look at it in this event that, yes, it's not supposed to be a political event, but it was in an election year where a number of normally, i would say evangelical republican supporters had questions about mitt romney and you saw president obama maybe able to seize this moment, so i think sometimes it serves a political opportunity. sometimes it serves this sort of, serves as an opportunity for the president to reach out, and certainly at a time right now when he's dealing with some very divisive issue
take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been able to take that mission and bring it into
's affiliated in a nonprofit way with a religion and against your beliefs, for example if you are a university or if you are a health system, they have made accommodations to ensure that you don't have to be involved in the direct provision the payment, the contracting the referral or any of the arrangements for ensuring that -- >> what about -- what about private companies like hobby lobby? the owners object on, you know, moral reasons that they don't want to pay for contraception for their employer, employees. >> i know folks have tried to talk about this as a religious liberty issue. that feels a bit like a smoke screen for folks who are really trying to impose their views about birth control on others. there is nothing in this law which in any way impedes an employer's ability to exercise his or her own religious beliefs. but there is nothing which says that religious liberty requires you to impose your beliefs on others. and by allowing for these accommodations for religious institutions but ensuring that -- in the private sector, if you are a business that's operating in the public secto
else's religion or somebody else's life. it's an area that just so thed to pass -- just voted to tax themselves so we could have better health care and better schools and better transportation. they look at washington and don't understand the fight in a lot of ways. >> host: specifically when it comes to technology-related issues, though, do you hear anything that your constituents -- >> guest: well, yes. there is concern about innovation and the role that current law has in the area of copyright and patent in stifling innovation. that's difficult to remedy. we had a patent bill that i actually ended up not voting for last year having worked on it for the years -- for 12 years that really didn't do what we'd hoped it would do. we've got an overarching scheme on copyright enforcement that is probably not that positive in term ors of technology -- terms of technology innovation. i'm sure you all remember the sopa brouhaha of last year. we stopped the overreach from the copyright max laws, but the technology companies -- i'm just talking about individuals who are inventing things and cr
somebody else's religion are somebody else's life. it's an area they voted to tax themselves we could have better health care and better schools. they look at washington and don't understand the fight in a lot of ways. >> host: specifically when it comes to technology related issues, do you hear anything that your constituency wants? >> guest: there is concern about innovation and the role that the current law has in the area in stifling innovation. that is difficult to remedy. we had a bill that i ended up not voting for last year having worked on it for 12 years that really didn't do what we had hoped it would do. we have got an overarching scheme on copyright enforcement that is probably not that positive in terms of technology innovation. i am sure you all remember the sofa brouhaha last year. we stop the overreach from the copyright board that the -- i'm not talking about the company's. i'm just talking about individuals who are inventing things and creating things feel that there is a problem in terms of the copyright regime and we come together and make sure that it works in the int
is abc7 news lisa amin go legion. lisa amin do. >> it is a religion festival and it happens once every 12 years. this year more than 100 million will descend on the area, and they will take a dip in the sacred river. >> these are the things we take in the river. >> he is packing light. >> anything i take and i pray to god to give me the courage and strength to take the pilgrimage. >> the pilgrimage has grown dramatically since 2001, the last one. >> you are talking about 110 to 120 million people. it is in one location the largest gathering of humans on earth jie. this is a satellite photo taken from space above. all of the dark red dots are people. one reason for the rise in attendance, technology and social media. you can see here hi-def cameras are everywhere and they have their own facebook fan page that are creating a buzz. >> networks like google plus and there are several social networks that are growing very quickly. events like this can easily drive in lots of viral traffic. >> they attracted harvard university. 36 students and faculty members traveled to the festival to study th
will be the experience of a lifetime. here is abc7 news lisa amin go legion. lisa amin do. >> it is a religion festival and it happens once every 12 years. this year more than 100 million will descend on the area, and they will take a dip in the sacred river. >> these are the things we take in the river. >> he is packing light. >> anything i take and i pray to god to give me the courage and strength to take the pilgrimage. >> the pilgrimage has grown dramatically since 2001, the last one. >> you are talking about 110 to 120 million people. it is in one location the largest gathering of humans on earth jie. this is a satellite photo taken from space above. all of the dark red dots are people. one reason for the rise in attendance, technology and social media. you can see here hi-def cameras are everywhere and they have their own facebook fan page that are creating a buzz. >> networks like google plus and there are several social networks that are growing very quickly. events like this ceasily drive in lots of viral traffic. >> they attracted harvard university. 36 students and faculty members traveled t
race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those amiable characteristics we think are worthy of the protections of our civil rights laws. in most states, there are modest exemptions to this employment at will doctrine around wrongful discharge. when an employer requires somebody to breakable law and order to keep their job or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of some well- defined ridden public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wide latitude because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person or entity that takes the risk and sets up the business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their businesses the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. this is but a small one. i am not saying you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified. in essence, what these laws do, right now they are saving employers from themselves. if they are ignoring all the unemployed workers, they really could be missing the best qualified person
's almost a religion. rhea: there are so many shoes here. so i'm gonna pick them up and you tell us what we have here. gay: okay, that is a victorian shoe. and you can see the fancy little spool heel, and a lot of the victorian shoes were very pointy. and then you would use your button hook to fasten your button right here. rhea: what about this? gay: okay, that is quite the fancy shoe. that's from about 1917. that's an edwardian shoe. and you can see that they were still using buttons. and the welt is striped, it's got your patent and your kidskin here; you got your wooden stacked heel in the back. it's just got everything. rhea: this is beautiful. i think this is a really really elegant shoe. gay: and that is a '20s shoe. you can see all the deco styling on it. and one of the nicer things they did, that they're not doing yet is this gorgeous little tassel. rhea: here's our next one. gay: and that's a '30s shoe. they started getting thicker heels in the '30s, a little bit more girly, little bit less of the deco look. and that is what we call a "south beach sky high," and
and it looks like the lone star state might have some. religion may have clients who say we are frightened here in new york? >> we deal with a very unique client base. they have a fixed budget, certain amount of income in an annual basis. it is pa how to handle those dollars. the question is, is that the wisest use of my money? nine times out of 10, where do you move to? texas, nevada, florida. liz: governor jerry brown is saying i don't like what governor perry is doing, using some tricks here. he has it all wrong. california, we have great weather, venture capital, an educated workforce. don't go to texas, come to california. >> they also have a state income tax, highest in the country, they have a corporate income tax, the highest gas taxes in the country, our clients are going desert looking to move. california is a great place and if you can afford to be there, it is a wonderful place to live but that is becoming less and less true for the average citizen. they need to find a lower-cost place to go and unfortunately texas ranks as number one business state in the country year after year. l
. and on the other hand, does the school have a first amendment freedom of religion argument? and that's the battle. ultimately, what's interesting here is the school jumped the gun, miguel. what happened is they brought a federal lawsuit against the teachers who never brought the case in federal court in the first place. the federal court will dils miss the case without ever answering this critical question. so we'll really never know the answer because there's no what the courts call justifiable issue. >> part of the argument from the teacher's side is the school is a for-profit sbi fi, not a not profit. >> doesn't matter. >> the if the school is receiving funds for the state and they are for profit, certain rules apply to them as opposed to if they were a not for profit. whether or not the teachers would be compelled to respond to an answer like this or to assert their faith in a questionnaire, which they denied, i think because the school is a profit-based institution the teachers had every right to deny it. it is discrimination. and i think the teachers will ultimately win this case. >> avery,
that works. the other goal is to protect religions from doing something they believe is morally wrong. my own belief is that the solution the obama administration reached here is win/win. i say this to someone who believes in the clinton case, that abortion should be safe, legal and rare. getting birth control to women for free will keep it rare. to keep the catholic church out of that transaction keeps it closer to the goal. this is what good, smart, progressive, morally upright politics is all about. and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris. and thanks to you for tuning in. i'm live tonight in sacramento, california. tonight's lead, america versus the nra. today, president obama took his fight for gun safety outside of washington. calling for action. debunking the nra lies and making sure everyone knows we can't wait for change. >> we don't have to agree on everything to agree it's time to do something. if we've got lobbyists in washington, claiming to speak for gun owners, saying something different, we n
. >> caller: that is not true. >> why don't you like homosexuals for religion reasons? >> caller: no i'm against homosexuality because of what happens when young boys get molested -- >> but that is pedophilia. >> caller: but you can also say that -- okay let's say a boy is 15 years old, and a 60 year old man from manbla wants to have sex with him -- >> man bla has about ten members nationwide. >> why should we not let you around young girls? >> because i'm not sick. >> i see. >> caller: i'm not saying all homosexuals are going to molest young boys. >> stephanie: oh, thank you. >> i think chris just poked a hole in your logic? >> these men are attracted to the same sex -- >> stephanie: are you saying that all pedophiles are gay? >> caller: no any man that molests a young boy is gay. he may not admit it because he is attracted to the male genitalia -- >> you are attracted to female genitalia, so why should we let you around young girls? >> caller: look there's plenty of men that go after young girls -- >> sir -- >> caller: i'm saying you should try to avoid the s
on religion. it is dropping a controversial health care form provision requiring religiously affiliated provision to cover cont contraceptions as part of the plans. jessica yellin is joining us with detalils. what is the latest then front, jessica? >> hi, wolf. this policy is meant to help those organizations like catholic universities that offer their own insurance policies, and self-insure, but object on moral grounds to offer contraception. does the policy go far enough? the jury is still out. >> medals of science -- >> reporter: obama administration officials say that proposed guidelines would ensure that women get contraception for free, and no objecting religious oorganization would have to pay for it, and a seemingly perfect compromise. >> we had to ensure that women have access to preventive services like contraception, and that the policy also respects religious beliefs. >> the policy would allow a self-insured organization like a catholic university to opt-out of providing birth control, and another insurance company would give employees birth control for free. >> this clarifi
together who did not usually come together. we were not bounded in a common race or religion. we are not a theocracy. we are not a minority. this nation was born with the ideals that a united people, but these ideals compel every generation to be more inclusive and welcoming. we realize this country was not a zero some political nation. in fact, the more we open up this country to inclusion, the better we are. women joining the work force has not diminished men. it expands our economy and opportunity for all. the education of poor people in the inner-city does not take away from others, it expands our economy and makes us all do better. this is the ideal of our country. as the rabbi would tell me, the jewish saying, that jews together are strong, but jews with other people are invincible. he african saying that spiderwebs united can tie up a line. the very principle of this country, one of my advisers told me one of the fundamental principles of islam. the oneness of the community. we recognize dependency and see strength. that became the problem solving idea that i took on. i be
happy to sponsor boy scouts and then they get more kids interested in the mormon religion. >> stephanie: oh, wow. so it's the mormons that are recruiting, not the gays. >> do they get the same prizes we do. >> stephanie: my toaster is lovely. >> even the mormons could -- as they did in the -- what is it, late '70s allow african-americans into the priesthood. they would have a revelation. >> stephanie: stop baptizing dead yous. >> exactly >> stephanie: words of the immortal judy tenuta. it could happen. back with more with matthew breen of "the advocate"." >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ i want the people who watch our show, to be able to come away armed with the facts, and the arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ freedom, freedom, freedom ♪ >> stephanie: it is the "stephanie miller show." welcome to it. twenty-one minutes after the hour. our guest live in studio, because he's so handsome and romantic. matthew breen, e
in a city like this, there are thousands of things that drive us apart. politics, ideology and even religion. we come together in the spirit of jesus who told us to love one another and to treat others as we want to be treated and love god with all of your heart, soul, mind and strength. it would be a better world if we just listen to it. >> as you look around the world i had a stand that you are sharing this meal. all 50 states, presidents, heads of state, leaders of all kind through prayer we believe that god has brought us together for a reason. as you listen closely to the program, try to figure out what god is saying to you. as you have heard this is hosted by the members of the house and senate and i would ask all of the members of the house and senate to stand at this time. with .. [applause] thank you. thank you. and now i'd like to introduce the head table that will lead us through this experience. i'll start on my right. today you can say that you ate breakfast with the president and as a gold metalist. at the end of the program, it will be offered by olympics champion gabriel doug
as you would have them do unto you. all cultures and races and religions. >> is that him. >> he is not in the painting. that is a farmer that was a end from of his in vermont where he lived at the time. >> who is this over here. >> one of my favorites. you can almost taste the turkey. >> quintessential thanksgiving piece. done for a very serious purpose during world war ii to articulate president roosevelts four freedoms. freedom of speech, freedom from want. fear dom from fear and freedom to worship. these are the reasons america went into war to preserve these freedoms for people all over the world. >> he also made statements too, look at this. >> after he stopped working for the saturday evening post where he had done 321 magazine covers through the his lifetime went to work for look magazine. the subject matter changed greatly and he he started painting the current events of the day and did some very important civil rights movement paintings. this young girl is walking to school will protected by the u.s. marshals i want indicating the first elementary school in new orleans.
and the receipt. >> make themselves out to, you know, kind of be a jerk. but also play the religion card as an excuse. >> reporter: pastor elois bell was a party of ten eating at an applebees in st. louis. the pastor did not appreciate the automatic 18% gratuity charged to large groups, so she scrawled on the receipt, i give god 10%, why do you get 18% and signed it pastor. that was too much. and she posted it on reddit. >> i thought it was comically immature. >> reporter: but pastor bell wasn't laughing once the receipt went viral and posters started calling her -- >> you hypocrite pastor. >> reporter: chelsea wasn't serving that table. at the end of the night, she heard about the receipt from the actual server. >> the server calls me over and says you're not going to believe this? >> reporter: the 18% gratuity was taken directly out of the pastor's credit card. she wrote zero in the space for additional tip, but says -- >> and i put $6 on the table. >> reporter: when the "i give god 10%" receipt became news, the pastor called applebees to complain. >> that they wanted me fired, the ser
the organization that it is religious and they want their employees to be similar religion. >> gregg: and they have every right. >> it's called the ministerial exception. it's in case law. it's exactly on point. if you are religious entity and focus is on that, there is a standard. they can make selections and appointments with hiring that are the same religious ilk. >> forprofit and nonprofit and you bring in the fair employment housing act. >> gregg: that is good point. by the way, that supreme court decision that we cited, due drew distinction forprofit and not. >> they are saying it's partially not for profit. this school says it is for profit, but i think that the court is going to still be the ministerial exception rule not for not for profits. >> gregg: if there is anybody that is performing a ministerial duty isn't it the teacher in the classroom, it's not the janitor. >> exactly right. >> that is the distinction in the supreme court case. >> gregg: ministerial distinction prevails. >> the ministers and teachers and not ministers. so it doesn't necessarily prevail. second of all, a minister
, specifically our melting pot of diversity. in five americans say they follow no religion at all. in today's i am america, carol costello look at the reasons why. >> here's a riddle. what do comedian kathy griffin and julianne moore and mark zuckerberg have in common in. >> hopefully one of america's most famous atheists. >> they are among those who do not believe god exists that. puts atheists around 5%. according to the pew study, one in five people claim they have no religious affiliation at all. why? the answers vary. there is a very activist atheist movement under way getting the message out on social media. take these facebook pages, for example. each has hundreds of thousands of likes. activist atheists have taken to you tube. ian evangelicals who tried to put the blame on godless schools for the newtown massacre. >> god didn't save the kids because he is not allowed in school. all of a sudden god respects the law of man. >> a massive crowd braved the cold for what was billed as the reason rally. >> i am here for the children in texas and other states who are being told lies about histo
the swamp and what it does, it is radicalizing people that are standing up against militants using religion as a mobilizing force. so i think that drones as an instrument may have had some secrecy in terms of position, but -- and it's like saying, well, we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come in, we use our own to run anti-terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. so drones are now -- we don't see them as productive at all. >> what do you tell the germ's staff -- what do you tell the staff -- >> you need to be a fly on that committee wall. >> jonathan. >> i think we are all. on the same page. members of the general's staff on where the future of this -- pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations, absolutely all of them for them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there have been a lot of drone strikes next door also. and in any case, you know that al qaeda is the whole al qaeda high valleys is pretty much through our cooperation and joint efforts. and that's something this administrati
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)

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